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Which of the following best describes the typical reaction of African-American writers to Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852)?
African Americans praised Stowe’s attempt to make enslaved characters sympathetic to white audiences, and appreciated the persuasive power of the novel.
Which battle during the War of 1812 allowed Andrew Jackson to emerge as a national “mythological” hero, an “anti–aristocratic, antimonarchical person from an obscure background”?
The Battle of New Orleans
Which of the following was not a direct result of the growth of newspaper and periodical publications in the United States during the antebellum years?
The increased presence of women authors in newspapers and magazines allowed Margaret Fuller and Emily Dickinson to take on work as editors of major periodicals, although both of them argued against the necessity of women’s suffrage.
Charles Brockdon Brown’s novel Edgar Huntly (1799) is an example of an early attempt to assert distinctive “native materials” unavailable to writers who were not Americans. Which of the following matches Brown’s description of the native materials he uses?
Incidents of Indian hostility, and the perils of the western wilderness.
In what ways did writers in this anthology attempt to position American literary nationalism in the context of the rest of the world?
Most authors had key friendships with European authors and sought to establish a sophisticated, comparative relationship between other world literatures and the distinctive American history and culture they wrote about.
Which of the following is not true of Margaret Fuller’s “The Great Lawsuit” (1843)?

a) It uses arguments found within Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence to argue that women deserve the same legal consideration as men.
b) It demands that women ought to have the right to vote.
c) It explores the reasons why women ought to be educated just as well as men.
d) It draws on Emersonian transcendentalism to promote an individual path to women’s equality separate from a collective movement.
d) It draws on Emersonian transcendentalism to promote an individual path to women’s equality separate from a collective movement.
In order to live up to the promise of the Battle of New Orleans, many American writers called for “emancipation” from British literary tradition. Which of the following is closest to the typical response of British literary nationalists?

a) Nobody reads American books.
b) American authors have no tradition of their own.
c) The more sophisticated American authors stress the connections between their works and those of British writers, rather than emphasizing the differences.
d) The writings of Americans are uncouth and unsophisticated.
a) Nobody reads American books.
Why did the urban population of American Catholics increase dramatically in the 1840s?
Irish Catholics emigrated to major American seaports because of a tragic potato blight.
Which of the following is not one of the challenges that critics have leveled against the idea of an American Renaissance?

a) Matthiessen promotes particular authors based on their technique and skill, rather than on their popularity with readers or their engagement with contemporary issues like slavery.
b) Matthiessen was wrong to enforce a cultural distinction between American authors and English authors, since they read and responded to each other’s works.
c) Critics have remarked that Matthiessen’s term “Renaissance” is misused, since no stable American national character had existed before 1820 to be “reborn.”
d) Women and minority writers are underrepresented in Matthiessen’s canon of great authors.
c) Critics have remarked that Matthiessen’s term “Renaissance” is misused, since no stable American national character had existed before 1820 to be “reborn.”
Why did travel literature, such as Caroline Kirkland’s A New Home–Who’ll Follow? and Margaret Fuller’s Summer on the Lakes, become an increasingly popular subgenre in the 1840s?
Population growth and territorial expansion had people thinking more often about open spaces and travel.
Charles Brockdon Brown’s novel Edgar Huntly (1799) is an example of an early attempt to assert distinctive “native materials” unavailable to writers who were not Americans. Which of the following matches Brown’s description of the native materials he uses?
Incidents of Indian hostility, and the perils of the western wilderness.
Which description best fits the character of American nationality from the 1790s until 1828, as depicted in the literature of that time?

a) Optimistic, hopeful, and assured of its future
b) Proud, headstrong, and bombastic
c) Doubtful, pessimistic, and dependent on other cultures
d) Provisional, vulnerable, and fragile
d) Provisional, vulnerable, and fragile
Which American authors were most successful in attracting a British audience in the antebellum years?
Anti–slavery authors such as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and William Wells Brown.
How closely connected were the authors of the American Renaissance?
They read and reacted to each other’s books and responded to the current issues and events, either by critiquing or by agreeing with and expanding on a previous author’s claims.
Why did women play such an important role in the urban reform movements of the 1840s?
Much of urban reform centered on creating secure domestic spaces within city environments, and women were recognized as authorities on domesticity.
Which transcendentalist author wrote “Slavery in Massachusetts” (1854) to express outrage resulting from the Fugitive Slave Law?
Henry David Thoreau
Why is Emerson’s essay “The American Scholar” (1837) often called a “declaration of cultural independence”?
His essay adapted European romanticism in order to argue for a clean break from America’s dependence on European traditions.
F. O. Matthiessen has called the antebellum period the “American Renaissance.” Which of the following best describes Matthiessen’s views on the significance of the literature of this period?
The appearance of significant, mature works that prompted English readers to reappraise the state of culture in the United States.
Which of the following was not a result of discrepancies between the copyright laws of the United States and England?
Crowds often met the next installments of serialized novels by famous British novelists (such as Charles Dickens’s Dombey and Son in 1848) as they arrived in port from overseas.
Which of the following does not describe a historical event that underscored the fluxional qualities of the nation’s character during the 1820s?

a) Native Americans were forced to emigrate from the eastern states to the central and western territories.
b) The Missouri Compromise failed to resolve the fierce debate over how and whether to restrict the expansion of slavery into the Louisiana Purchase.
c) South Carolina declared its right to nullify decrees of the federal government.
d) John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry, Virginia, demonstrated the willingness of abolitionists to adopt violent tactics to fight slavery.
d) John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry, Virginia, demonstrated the willingness of abolitionists to adopt violent tactics to fight slavery.
Why were authors such as Melville, Dickinson, Thoreau, and Whitman neglected until the twentieth century?
Because they explicitly attempted to create new American literary traditions, their works often addressed readers who did not yet exist.
Which of the following best describes Emersonian transcendentalism?
A focus on the ability of the individual to break free from social constraints and realize the godlike powers of the imagination.
Which of the following works was not written in response to the end of the Civil War?

a) Abraham Lincoln, “The Gettysburg Address”
b) Herman Melville, Battle Pieces
c) Walt Whitman, “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d”
d) Frederick Douglass, “The Lessons of the Hour”
a) Abraham Lincoln, “The Gettysburg Address”.
Because of their access to water routes to the interior of the country, which two cities were the major publishing hubs in the United States before 1840?
New York and Philadelphia
Which American thinker wrote in the essay “Man the reformer” (1841) that the “doctrine of reform had never seen such a scope as at the present hour”?
Ralph Waldo Emerson
American authors such as Cooper and Sedgwick looked to which British author of historical fiction as a model for the construction of a literary tradition for their young nation?
Sir Walter Scott
How did Native Americans fit into the popular conception of “Manifest Destiny” after the Mexican War and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848)?
Most whites felt that Native Americans were destined for extinction.
Which decade covered by this anthology do the editors name “the first great culmination of American literary nationalism,” featuring authors such as Washington Irving, William Cullen Bryant, James Fenimore Cooper, and Sedgwick?
1820s.
In what ways did writers in this anthology attempt to position American literary nationalism in the context of the rest of the world?
Most authors had key friendships with European authors and sought to establish a sophisticated, comparative relationship between other world literatures and the distinctive American history and culture they wrote about.
Washington Irving, "Rip Van Winkle"

When Rip returns from the forest, no one seems to recognize him. When he describes himself as “a loyal subject of the King, God bless him!”, he sends the town into an uproar. Why was this a problem?
While Rip was asleep, the United States had been established, and the town wondered whether he was a spy sent from England.
Washington Irving, "Rip Van Winkle"

Which of the following does not describe Rip’s characteristic response to one of his wife’s lectures?
Promising to do better.
Washington Irving, "Rip Van Winkle"

While avoiding the terrors of Dame Van Winkle one day in the Kaatskills, Rip hears a sound that begins his odd adventure. That sound is described most aptly as:
Someone crying his name.
Washington Irving, "Rip Van Winkle"

The man dressed in antique Dutch clothing is bearing something on his back, and asks for Rip’s help toting it through the mountains. What does he carry?
A cask of liquor.
Washington Irving, "Rip Van Winkle"

What does the narrator of “Rip Van Winkle” describe as “the great error in Rip’s composition”?
His unwillingness to work.
Washington Irving, "Rip Van Winkle"

How long is Rip asleep in the woods?
Twenty years.
Washington Irving, "Rip Van Winkle"

Once Rip tells the town what happened, they consult old Peter Vanderdonk, who confirms that the Kaatskills are haunted. Whom does Peter name as the Dutch explorer who periodically appears in the mountains?
Hendrick Hudson.
Washington Irving, "Rip Van Winkle"

Who finally recognizes Rip upon his return to town?
An old woman who was once his neighbor.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature

Emerson advises anyone who wants to see nature for what it truly is to go into the woods, the “plantations of God”, because there:
One finds perpetual youth.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature

“There is a property in the horizon which no man has but he whose eye can integrate all its parts.” Which man is Emerson describing?
The poet.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature

Which of the following is not something Emerson considers an element of beauty as found in nature?

a) Sweet simplicity.
b) Material commodity.
c) Spiritual perfection.
d) Intellectual appreciation.
b) Material commodity.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature

In his chapter on idealism, Emerson describes how feelings of the sublime result from a recognition “of the difference between man and nature” (1124, full ed.). When he continues by discussing the activities and abilities of the poet, how does he express what the poet does?
The poet indulges his imagination and represents nature as a symbol of his passions.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature

In what way does Emerson relate language to nature?
Language is the vehicle by which nature is symbolized in words for the soul.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature

Which of the following most closely resembles the meaning of Emerson’s call “to see the world with new eyes” (1134, full ed.) near the end of Nature?
We must train ourselves to recognize the miracles of spirit in the smallest details of nature.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature

At the end of Nature, how does Emerson compare the prospects of Adam and Caesar to those of the common man?
They are equally good, since for the common man, just as it was for Caesar, nature is always available and ready to be shaped for whatever end he wishes.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature

In the introduction to Nature, Emerson divides the universe into which two units?
Soul and nature.
Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Young Goodman Brown"

Why does young goodman Brown first venture into the woods?
He promised someone he would meet him there.
Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Young Goodman Brown"

Along the way, young goodman Brown and the devil meet which three people?
Goody Cloyse, deacon Gookin, and the minister.
Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Young Goodman Brown"

What is young goodman Brown’s companion carrying?
A staff shaped like a snake.
Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Young Goodman Brown"

What ritual does the devil attempt to perform in the woods, with goodman Brown as the object?
A baptism.
Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Young Goodman Brown"

When goodman Brown returns to town, everything about his perception of the religious elders of Salem has changed. Which of the following best describes his new attitude toward them?
He considers them all to be hypocrites.
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